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7/25/2014
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Email a Friend Flesh Fly
By Jason Akl

As the thousands of salmon deposit spawn on the bottoms of rivers everywhere their mysterious lifecycle comes to an end. When these river giants start to decay pieces of flesh release from the carcasses and float downstream where ravenous rainbows waste little time cleaning up the scraps. So much attention is paid to bears and eagles feeding on the dying salmon, but rainbow trout play as important of role as the others in this process. Lucky for fly anglers there is a fly pattern that simulates these decaying pieces of meat, the flesh fly.

Flesh flies are nothing more than bunny types of flies that use pastel shades of orange, red and white to imitate the many bits and pieces of flesh from decaying fish. Natural shades of white and grey are always a safe bet to carry with you but patterns that incorporate oranges and whites together have definite fish catching ability.

Fishing flesh fly patterns is easy. Basically these flies are effective anytime there is salmon in the rivers, late summer and fall. Cast this fly upstream of the hole you intend to fish and allow it to drift naturally along the bottom. Using an indicator on your line will help you identify strikes quicker especially if fishing faster flows. Adding a split shot or two to your line or a few extra wraps of lead free weight to the body of the fly will help get your flesh fly down deep fast to where the big fish hold.

When the rainbows are turned on to eating these bits and pieces of salmon flesh it will not take long for you to see the potency of this simple pattern. On your next trip pack a few flesh flies in various sizes and colors and see if you can tempt a few of those voracious rainbows in biting.

Flesh Fly
Step 1 1. Start this fly by placing your hook into the vice securely and attaching your thread behind the hook eye. Take a few turns of lead (or lead free) weight around the hook shank to add some extra weight to the fly if you are going to be fishing deeper water.
Flesh Fly
Step 2 2. Clip about a three inch section of tan zonker strip and attach it to the hook shank leaving about one inch hanging off the back of the hook as a tail. Make sure to wrap down the zonker strip tightly to the top of the hook shank because in the proceeding steps you will be putting lots of stress on the tied down zonker. Once you have the tail in place wrap the zonker forward three turns being careful not to wrap down any of the zonker fur with the proceeding wraps. Tie off the tan zonker and clip the excess material.
Flesh Fly
Step 3 3. Select a small strip of white zonker and tie it down to the hook shank infront of the tan zonker you just finished wrapping. Wrap the white zonker strip forward two turns like you did the tan zonker and tie off behind the hook eye. Form a small head and whip finish and cement the thread.
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Click photos to enlarge
Flesh Fly
Products for this fly:
Tiemco TMC 9394 Hooks
Danville Fly Master Plus Thread
Lead Wire, Spooled
Cross Cut Rabbit Strips
Rabbit Strips (Dyed)
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